Category Archives: Social Justice

Ginger: A Transgendered Story

A transgendered woman shares thoughts on training police departments and other organizations about transgender sensitivity as well as her life before and after her personal transition.

Dick’s guest, Ginger Baier, is a Transgender Health Advocate at the OutReach LGBT Community Center in Madison, Wisconsin.

 

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The Case for Reparations

The average American  black family has 1/12 the wealth of the average white family. Some of the reasons for this might surprise you or even shock you. Recently, Congress has taken up the issue of reparations.

Dick’s guest, Kaleem Caire is a national leader in the K-12 movement. He is also a leader in the Madison community working  to close the racial divide and inequities and spent 4 years as the president of the Madison Urban League.

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Human Trafficking 101

Human trafficking involves thousands of victims around the world, including the United States. Who are the perpetrators and victims of human trafficking? How can this happen?

Dick’s guest is Nancy J. Hartwell, author of Harem Slave who first began investigating human trafficking worldwide after a friend was kidnapped and rumored to have been sold into sexual slavery.

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Workplace Bias

How can unconscious workplace bias affect decision making with employers and coworkers? Is there a way to make ourselves less biased or unbiased?

Dick’s guest is Deborah Vaughn Biddle, founder of High Performance Development Solutions LLC and is also a diversity and inclusion corporate consultant.

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Immigration 101

What are the current immigration laws and policies? How can these help us evaluate the “wisdom” of suggested changes?

Dick’s guest, Shabnam Lofti, is the head of a law firm specializing in immigration law. Her firm serves clients throughout the Unites States and around the world.

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Crimeless Parole Revocation

In some states, people who commit non-criminal parole violations return to prison in the same numbers as new criminal offenders. Why does this happen? Is it just? What changes are needed?

Dick’s guest is Cecelia Klingele, a law professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her numerous articles and areas of research focus on criminal justice administration and community supervision of those on conditional release, such as probation, parole or extended release.

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Living as an Undocumented Immigrant

What is life like for the over 11,000,000 undocumented immigrants living in the United States who face deportation? How do they cope?

Dick’s guests are Laura Minero, a Ph.D. candidate who came to this country at the age of five and is undocumented but has Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status and Dr. Karen Menendez Coller, Executive Director of Centro Hispano in Madison, Wisconsin.

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Innocent and Behind Bars

Of the over 2 million Americans behind bars, about 100,000 didn’t do it. They are innocent. The Innocence Project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School is on the cutting edge of helping to exonerate the wrongfully convicted, including Steven Avery.

Dick’s guest is Keith Findley, law professor and co-founder and co-director of the Wisconsin Innocence Project. He is also the past president of the Innocence Network, an affiliation of 68 Innocence Projects around the world.

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Understanding U.S. Poverty Programs

How does the federal government assist the poor? Is the level of support declining? How does our economic compassion for the poor compare to other industrialized countries? What are the specific poverty programs? Who gets the benefits? What change in poverty programs policies could have a huge positive impact on poor families with children and cost nothing?

Dick’s guest is Dr. Tim Smeeding, one of the nation’s leading experts on poverty. He is the Lee Rainwater Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs and Economics . He was director of the Institute for Research on Poverty from 2008–2014.

He was the founding director of the Luxembourg Income Study from 1983-2006. Professor Smeeding’s recent work has been on social and economic mobility across generations, inequality of income, consumption and wealth, and poverty in national and cross-national contexts.

His books include: SNAP Matters: How Food Stamps Affect Health and Well Being (Stanford University Press, 2015); Monitoring Social Mobility in the 21st Century (Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 2015); From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage(Russell Sage Foundation, 2012); Persistence, Privilege and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility (Russell Sage Foundation, 2011); The Handbook of Economic Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2009); Poor Kids in a Rich Country: America’s Children in Comparative Perspective(Russell Sage Foundation, 2003); and The American Welfare State: Laggard or Leader?, (Oxford University Press, 2010). Dr. Smeeding earned a B.A. at Canisius College, an M.A. at the University of Connecticut, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in economics at the University of Wisconsin.

His recent work also has been on inequality, wealth, and poverty amongst elders, children and young unmarried families, including the children of immigrants in a cross-national context.

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